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March 19, 2012

Comments

K O'M

I think there is a legitimate argument that the regulatory burden has become too onerous on small businesses without any meaningful benefit to investors. Perhaps the reason they aren't generating more jobs is that they are having difficulty raising capital.

I don't know enough about the JOBS Act (though I'm usually suspicious of bills with catch acronyms for titles). However, you have been critical of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and there were lots of accommodations made for small businesses on that law.

I think that the key test for any new law or reg should be whether the actual benefits it provides outweigh its actual costs. Too often, hastily crafted laws don't really address the issue, and are passed out of a desire to be seen "doing something."

Independent Accountant

TS:
I disagree and think Sarbox is a scam and should be repealed.

Steve

"I think that the key test for any new law or reg should be whether the actual benefits it provides outweigh its actual costs"

More importantly, who will reap the benefits and who will bear the costs? This will benefit the Wall Street Banksters at the expense of the public. Regulation is never intended to benefit the public; its always designed to benefit the lawmaker and his patrons.

Dave

If "[t]he perception in the market was that 'SB-2 companies' could be hiding something important," why do you believe the market isn't smart enough to guage the quality of research reports that would be beyond the purview of the SEC? If these SEC guys are so smart why don't they get out of gov't and establish a service that grades research reports? The SEC, despite all the hundreds of millions of our money spent on them, doesn't exactly have a stellar track record. At least when an investor is defrauded it is only his money that he voluntarily invested that is lost and he can sue. When the SEC imposes a faulty, costly reg or implies its seal of approval, we all are forced to pay. Your faith in gov't oversight of the extremely complex market is misplaced.

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